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Is Eco-Tourism Legit Or A Gimmick?
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Is Eco-Tourism Legit Or A Gimmick?

Eco-tourism

Is Eco-Tourism Legit Or A Gimmick?

Would you travel around the world to pick up someone else’s garbage? Or to learn about the looming climate crisis we all hear about? I would imagine eco-tourism would be a hard sell for most people. But believe it or not, there is a growing market for travel related to our climate and conservation of our environment. If organizations offer it, that mean someone has to be buying it right?

In a variety of different ways there are organizations offering environmentally focused tours and cultural offerings. From tour packages that take visitors to pick up plastic along the canals of Amsterdam. To a museum dedicated to climate change in Denmark. This begs the question; is environmental related travel a strong enough attraction to make you buy that plane ticket?

What Is Eco-Tourism?

To be clear here. When talking about ecotourism, what is implied are the travel packages, tours, and cultural offerings that promote, highlight, or support the conservation of our environment. For a great example of this phenomenon at play, look no further than the canals of Amsterdam.

 

Plastic Whale

Plastic Whale calls itself a plastic fishing company. Essentially, a social enterprise with a mission to make the world’s waters plastic-free and create value from plastic waste. What they do is talk folks on boat tours of the Amsterdam canals. On these boat tours they put people to work. Participants do their part on the boat ride to pick up stranded garbage left on the Dutch canals.

 

Eco-tourism

Photo via Plastic Whale

 

The folks at Plastic Whale don’t just stop there. The team then uses the plastic collected from these tours to build additional boat for their fleet. It started in 2011 with a single challenge to build a boat made of plastic waste. Today, they have a fleet of ten boats made from plastic.

 

eco-tourism

Photo via Plastic Whale

 

Climatourium in Denmark

Photo via 3XN

 

Architecture and design firm, 3XN, is looking to realize its proposal for a museum dedicated to climate change on the water front of Lemvig, Denmark.

The design not only aims to tell a story about climate change, but also celebrate the area’s cultural history as a fishing town.

 

Photo via 3XN

 

Titled the “Climatorium”, the museum will serve as a strong information center, hosting exhibitions and conferences about issues surrounding climate change as well as concerts and events. The proposal also includes a café and hang-out space, with hopes of it becoming a new local meeting place.

 

Photo via 3XN

But don’t book your flight just yet. The project is set to be complete in 2020. Hopefully there still enough nature left to enjoy it by then.

 

For more stories about eco-tourism – check out our post on a energy neutral hotel set for construction in the Arctic Circle.

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