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Curved Solar Canopy For The New Barilla Pavilion In Italy
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Curved Solar Canopy For The New Barilla Pavilion In Italy

Solar-Powered Pavilion In Parma

Modern architecture is being pushed to its limits as designers and developers move beyond the primary geometric shapes like triangles, squares, and spheres to produce unique polygons beyond our wildest imaginations.

Structures that curve, dip, and dive are rising all over the world. All using a variety of different materials. One of these new materials, photovoltaics, are also being introduced into building designs. This is a rather interesting development since this materials offers much more than just shading and protection from the elements. But a means to harvest energy from the sun.

 

Image via Open Architecture Systems

 

London based architecture studio, Open Architecture Systems, looks to tap into the power of photovoltaics to produce an elaborate structure that blends in with its surroundings. The proposed designs were produced for Italian pasta company, Barilla. The structure would be a new addition to the company’s campus in Parma, Italy. The plan envision a series of pavilions linked together by an enveloping solar canopy. 

 

Solar Canopy Designs

Images via Open Architecture Systems

 

Solar Canopy Designs

Images via Open Architecture Systems

 

“Our design approach begins with the idea of bringing something unique to the existing site, a new topography that defines low as well as high points. It is on this new topography that we then define the boundaries of the pavilion’s footprint, a covered space that is sheltered by a canopy under which the programme is distributed by its different functions. Much like an event space, the new Barilla pavilion acts as a container for new activities, community gathering and exploration.”

-Open Architecture Systems

 

The highlight of the design features a solar canopy thats bends and curves according to the topography of the landscape to create high and low points within the building. Adding even more texture to the canopy are the perforated grid of curved photovoltaic panels giving the building a source of natural ventilation within the structure. The canopy sort of resembles spaghetti strings, ironic given the company its produced for. But these features will allow the building to further reduce its environmental footprint. 

 

Images via Open Architecture Systems

 

The new Barilla pavilion hopes to house a research facility, auditorium, store, exhibition, and restaurant once the construction is complete.

 

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